Author Topic: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!  (Read 374 times)

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Offline Pyraxis

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Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« on: October 08, 2017, 01:44:11 PM »
I'm going to a dinner with a group of people from work today who don't have families to go to. Thanksgiving is actually tomorrow but we're getting together today. I volunteered to do the turkey.  :zombiefuck:

It's weird, I never would have done this on my own, but WolFish would have loved it. It was a treat for him to be able to cook for a big group - he was an awesome cook who could do the food part no problem, but not the social skills involved in setting up such a thing. He would have been all over this. Something makes me want to do it anyway. Fingers crossed I don't fuck it up. The turkey is all ready to go into the oven later this afternoon, and I'm working on the mushroom leek stuffing, which was a specialty we started doing in the last few years, a recipe we discovered together. Basically you go to the grocery store and get one of every kind of mushroom they have (wish I had some of Lestat's specialty exotic ones hand collected!) and put it together into stuffing.
People just like to think they can know who the monsters are, but they can't.

Offline Jack

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2017, 02:25:50 PM »
Happy Thanksgiving.

Offline 'andersom'

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2017, 02:37:19 PM »
Good luck with the turkey and all the memories it brings.

Happy Thanksgiving.
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Offline Queen Victoria

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2017, 02:54:15 PM »
Mushroom leek stuffing sounds good.

When Thanksgiving comes I remember a customer one Saturday coming to Popeyes to pick up her fried turkey for a party later that day.  She was quite upset when she found out that it was fried and then frozen.  Thus it wouldn't thaw in time for the party.  I didn't know that was the practice for companies, but it makes sense that they cannot fry turkeys to order and have them hot for pick-up.
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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2017, 07:45:14 PM »
OMG It's Canadian Thanksgiving!! :GA:

I'll check tomorrow to see if Canada gets a Google Doodle for that.  :orly:
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Offline renaeden

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2017, 09:42:53 PM »
I had never heard of Canadian Thanksgiving before. Nor thought it would be this time of year.

Hoping you have a great time, Pyraxis. :)
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Offline Pyraxis

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2017, 12:23:18 AM »
It's the frozen northlands, our growing season is shorter than all those rednecks across the border.

I managed to pull it off.  :o Someone who was there said the turkey must have been made by someone with practice doing turkeys, because it was done perfectly. I'm not the one with the practice. I've just seen it done.
People just like to think they can know who the monsters are, but they can't.

Offline 'andersom'

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2017, 01:59:56 AM »
Practice by osmosis and observation.
I can do upside down chocolate moo things!

Offline Phoenix

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2017, 08:23:08 AM »
Happy turkey day! I'm cooking ours today  :viking:
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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2017, 09:49:51 AM »
Happy Canadian Thanksgiving! :)
I know, I know, it's just that I don't know what should be there. :GA:
Could put some awesome Jack quote in there.

Offline Lestat

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2017, 11:34:08 AM »
Happy days hun. Glad it brings fond memories to you of wolfy. *hugs*

*lestat turns up at Raxy's door bearing a basket of saffron milk-caps and gets to frying, roasting, grilling with mozzarella, with and without chilli pepper shreds, and sprinkled with black pepper* And if lucky, some porcini, bay bolete (Xerocomus badius, don't be put off by the fact that they turn a lurid shade of blue, they are quite edible and very tasty as long as you get to them before the fungus-gnats have chance to lay eggs in the and the mushrooms go maggoty, since for some reason those little bastard mushroom flies like to eat bay boletes, or at least their larvae do, as much as I like to take a nice long, long long hike, albeit fuelled by pain meds and if its a long enough journey then perhaps a line or two of amphetamine, methamphetamine or better yet, N-ethylamphetamine, if its one of those mushroom-hunts that has me up before first light, timed so I arrive just at the crack of dawn before anybody else with a growling stomach and a taste for wild fungi has a chance to go wherever woodlands I'm off to hunt in and with the intention of heading for home only when its so late that there is just enough time to get into a bar before actually getting back to the house, to snatch a quick few foaming pints of much needed cold beer and preferably a pre-steak-steak, if that makes sense :autism:

(and if it doesn't, then what I mean, is I am very partial indeed to having my wild mushrooms served accompanied by a couple of big juicy slabs of sizzling hot fried fillet or rump steak, which, unsurprisingly perhaps, also involves wild mushrooms, by way of my special steak and chilli spice blend, that contains as two of the ingredients, and two of the absolutely crucial, special ingredients, some dried Chalciporus piperatus, aka the peppery boletus, a small to medium sized tan-capped ruddy rust-colored underside which has pores rather than gills, a fiery hot peppery bite to it that is whilst hot, different to chilli peppers, black pepper, water-pepper [Polygonum hydropiper, unrelated to either black pepper or chillies, rather, its a plant related to Bistort that grows in meadow or pasture land where its close to a river, or in marshy spots and if I can get any, will go in the spice mixture too]

*Lestat also favours 'raxy with some slippery jacks and larch boletes. Which means, just as with saffron milkies, that you can consider yourself in high esteem indeed, since these three are some of my absolute favourites, and in the case of saffron milk-caps are valued greatly by mushroom hunters and gourmet chefs on the continent *

(not as much here, in britain, but not because of inferior quality, on the contrary, britains traditionally have a long history of being rather phobic when it comes to mushrooms, with the prevailing attitude being 'if it didn't come out of a plastic tub or a crate at a market then its a poisonous 'toadstool' to be avoided like the plague or kicked over. Perhaps stemming from the druidic times, where psilocybin-containing psychedelic mushrooms were, as they should be, considered a sacred gift from mother nature, but then, restricted to the druids themselves and regarded as not for the uninitiated; which down the years, evolved into a less concrete, more abstract and generalized aversion to, rather than religious prohibition of, the common man eating wild mushrooms of all kinds, not just the psychedelic Psilocybe species and other mushrooms outside the family which contain psilocybin and/or psilocin. So these days most brits are afraid of the very idea of actually EATING such a thing as a wild mushroom.)

Not to say of course that nowadays there aren't plenty of people who have read up and familiarized theselves with the general principles that must be followed for a safe, long-lived mushroom hunter to live by, and of course, both the most important, and dangerous poisonous species and the best of the edibles at least.
Some restrict themselves to just a few easily identified species, hell some poor buggers really miss out and will only eat field mushrooms (Agaricus species, a fair few being meadow and grassland species, probably most of them in fact      )                                                                                                      ,

Thats what I know are out to be had atm, and are some of the best wild mushrooms I've ever tasted. Can't say as I've ever tried stuffing them up a disembowelled turkey's what-used-to-be-an-anus.  But you could always try. I do make a helluva mean fried steak with fly agaric flavour-enhanced gravy too. I say so myself, and not to blow my own trumpet, but I must confess, I do have magic fingers when it comes to beef, and not bad when it comes to lamb either. Steaks, chilli con carne, cottage pies, I can even juice up a beef and tomato pot noodle and make it tastier.

Beyond the pale. Way, way beyond the pale.

Requiescat in pacem, Wolfish, beloved of Pyraxis.

Offline Pyraxis

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2017, 11:45:41 AM »
Happy days hun. Glad it brings fond memories to you of wolfy. *hugs*

*lestat turns up at Raxy's door bearing a basket of saffron milk-caps and gets to frying, roasting, grilling with mozzarella, with and without chilli pepper shreds, and sprinkled with black pepper* And if lucky, some porcini, bay bolete (Xerocomus badius, don't be put off by the fact that they turn a lurid shade of blue, they are quite edible and very tasty as long as you get to them before the fungus-gnats have chance to lay eggs in the and the mushrooms go maggoty, since for some reason those little bastard mushroom flies like to eat bay boletes, or at least their larvae do, as much as I like to take a nice long, long long hike, albeit fuelled by pain meds and if its a long enough journey then perhaps a line or two of amphetamine, methamphetamine or better yet, N-ethylamphetamine, if its one of those mushroom-hunts that has me up before first light, timed so I arrive just at the crack of dawn before anybody else with a growling stomach and a taste for wild fungi has a chance to go wherever woodlands I'm off to hunt in and with the intention of heading for home only when its so late that there is just enough time to get into a bar before actually getting back to the house, to snatch a quick few foaming pints of much needed cold beer and preferably a pre-steak-steak, if that makes sense :autism:

(and if it doesn't, then what I mean, is I am very partial indeed to having my wild mushrooms served accompanied by a couple of big juicy slabs of sizzling hot fried fillet or rump steak, which, unsurprisingly perhaps, also involves wild mushrooms, by way of my special steak and chilli spice blend, that contains as two of the ingredients, and two of the absolutely crucial, special ingredients, some dried Chalciporus piperatus, aka the peppery boletus, a small to medium sized tan-capped ruddy rust-colored underside which has pores rather than gills, a fiery hot peppery bite to it that is whilst hot, different to chilli peppers, black pepper, water-pepper [Polygonum hydropiper, unrelated to either black pepper or chillies, rather, its a plant related to Bistort that grows in meadow or pasture land where its close to a river, or in marshy spots and if I can get any, will go in the spice mixture too]

*Lestat also favours 'raxy with some slippery jacks and larch boletes. Which means, just as with saffron milkies, that you can consider yourself in high esteem indeed, since these three are some of my absolute favourites, and in the case of saffron milk-caps are valued greatly by mushroom hunters and gourmet chefs on the continent *

Yeeeahhh... that's what I'm talking about.  :autism: (does that look like drooling?)

With the mushroom leek stuffing, we don't usually make it inside the turkey, but in a separate pan. If it were in the turkey it would add to the cooking time and we're usually running behind schedule anyway. Besides, I made the turkey yesterday, so while there are plenty of delicious leftovers, there's no reason the mushrooms couldn't be paired with steak today. Steak with mushrooms and gravy, albeit not as exotic as yours, was another thing we used to make together.

The stuffing goes in the neck hole, btw, not the anus.  :laugh:
People just like to think they can know who the monsters are, but they can't.

Offline Lestat

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #12 on: October 09, 2017, 01:36:44 PM »
To be honest raxy, I couldn't tell the difference which hole is which, if it weren't for the legs. Even then I'm not entirely sure, I THINK the ones tied up are at the arse end but not sure. I don't go for turkey really.  And I don't like stuffing either.

And leeks...ew jesus. I don't eag veg, but leeks, are the worst. I HATE them. Can't fucking stand the things, and definitely couldn't force myself to eat them, much less keep a face on that says anything but 'do NOT get between me and the bog if you've half a synapse to speak of'

Prefer chicken to turkey really. I've always found turkey to turn out either too dry, or sopping wet. I like red meat, or if none to be had, fish or shellfish, saltwater fish rather than fresh water fish species. But red meat is definitely the favourite, as far as dead animals go. Not so much a pork fan though, I find it too fatty and too overly sweet. As for wild mushrooms, I have those I like, and some I absolutely despise.  I don't like shop button mushrooms, or indeed MOST Agaricus species (same genus as the shop 'white button' and 'brown cap' 'portobello' etc. come from), although there are exceptions, some smell of and have a strong flavour of aniseed and there are some really good ones to be found, a few poisonous ones to be avoided in the family but most of these turn yellow, and none are killers, not in the UK, there's only one lethal one, A.aurantioviolaceus, and that is I believe, restricted to regions of tropical north africa, so we are quite unlikely to run into those, I don't believe it is common there either. The toxic ones we may encounter that are related to the generic 'shop mushroom' aren't severely poisonous, more the sort of thing that causes a day or two of misery with stomach upset, vomiting, diarrhea and sweating, self-limiting and not likely to put anybody in hospital if they are the only source of the poisoning and the symptoms are not masking those of another, deadly species also consumed.

Eaten plenty real good treats, and also some that were absolutely vile. Favourites being sulfur polypore (laetiporus sulfureus, aka chicken of the woods) the parasol (Macrolepiota procera), porcini (Boletus edulis, B.aereus and a couple of relatives of them) giant puffball (Langermannia gigantea, a hell of a culinary delight, and they are HUGE, a single puffball can grow to a meter in diameter or even larger, and weigh more than I do, and when picked young and at their best, are absolutely delicious, and completely impervious to misidentification, as their size alone means that within days of first appearing above ground they have already outstripped any but one other mushroom in size, and that other is also edible, reputed to be excellent eating, and looks, although like the giant puffball, rounded in profile the cauliflower fungus grows on tree roots and has a brain-like convoluted surface and different coloration. Even a blind man could, if told that what they were feeling was a mushroom, identify either species by size and texture alone) and the larch bolete and slippery jack bolete [technically not a bolete, they are in the genus Suillus] and of all, my favourite might well be either the giant puffball, or the saffron milk-cap, a bright orange mushroom throughout, with slight pitting on the stem, and decurrent gills, also orange, which also bleeds an orange-colored milky liquid when the flesh is wounded, and which has been highly prized since roman times or even before, they go somewhat greenish in color with age or bruising, although to no detriment to the flavour, and I got rather lucky, since they are at best uncommon, to bordering on rare. Not threatened, and its fine to pick them without threatening the survival of the species here, but I got blessed in that I had the excellent fortune to find a forest here, a large place, acidic soiled pinewoods although mixed with quite a lot of broad-leaved trees, oak, silver birch, sweet chestnut, a really good selection for finding mycorrhizal mushroom species of a great variety, and that happens to be productive of LARGE quantities of saffron milk-caps of excellent quality, size and flavour, as well as bay boletes, larch boletes and slippery jacks in good numbers, some fly agarics (a species always listed as poisonous in the guidebooks, but in fact, is psychoactive in larger quantities and in medium amounts it is very versatile as a herbal medicine and a few spoonfuls can work wonders with meat dishes, dried and powdered. They just need to be specially prepared, by means of an overnight long, slow heat-curing process by putting the caps on foil-lined baking sheets, turning over occasionally and propping open the door of the oven ajar, leaving the gas flame on the absolute minimum for it to remain lit, which decarboxylates a neurotoxin, ibotenic acid, forming muscimol, the psychotropic oneirogen and dissociative-esque hallucinogen, and medicine depending on the way its used and the quantity, and in smaller measures the keystone ingredient of my custom steak spice. Its only poison if not correctly prepared. And if they are prepared correctly they can themselves be prepared for the table, by means of first par-boiling in water, throwing away the water, changing the water for a second pan full, boiling again, throwing away that water and then finally cooking. It can't be eaten raw, else it will make the consumer ill, but once prepared its one of my favourite mushrooms too, and whilst pretty much everybody avoids eating it or having anything to do with it, it is quite safe and of much use when you but know what to do with it.)

And on the other hand, there have been things like the amathyst Deceiver, 'edible', and not spoken of in the guidebooks either as superb nor awful. Tried frying some last year along with a harvest of various other species and they were absolutely disgusting. Couldn't even swallow the things, more or less involuntarily spat the things out. Or worse still, the stinkhorn. The egg stage of them is meant to be edible. I made the mistake of believing the books on that and spent the rest of the night after the meal including a few stinkhorn witch-eggs in the evening busily hugging the shitter at my grandmother's house and retching up bile. That was NOT a pleasant experience. Never been poisoned per se, and they are known not to be truly toxic, but either I had a bad reaction (some people do, even to things like oyster mushroom, sulfur polypore, even porcini make some people sick) or those stink horn witch-eggs aren't as edible as the textbooks make them out to be. I've never had an accident that resulting in poisoning, is what I mean, I knew what I was eating, was not me that got things wrong, but the books telling me they are fine to eat. Just trust me on that one, they aren't and you don't want to taste the things either, they taste nearly as rotten as the adult stink horn fungus reeks, and those buggers you'll always know are around long before you ever see one, you can smell the things hundreds of meters off, and its truly foul, like rotting flesh and shit.  Needless to say the adult form is most certainly going to be inedible. Doesn't look appetizing either, looks like a dick covered in shit at the bellend-end and growing from ruptured bollocks filled with gelatinous slime, with the stem (which is almost one with the rudimentary 'cap', that is no more than a filmy layer loosely placed on top of the cock-like 'stem', covered in greenish slime with the appearance of diarrhea from somebody pretty ill at the time and a smell that makes you wish it was just that.) having a texture like polyurethane foam.
Beyond the pale. Way, way beyond the pale.

Requiescat in pacem, Wolfish, beloved of Pyraxis.

Offline Pyraxis

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2017, 06:31:32 PM »
Actually... I think you're right about the arse end. I got confused because the skin gets pulled down over the other hole, which makes it look kind of like a puckered asshole with a covering.  :-[

The whole point of brining a turkey and not stuffing it is so it doesn't get dry, especially the white meat. That and putting some flavour into the meat. I prefer the dark meat myself, I find the white pretty bland. But each to their own taste. For sopping wet, you're supposed to pat it down with paper towel or something when it comes out of the brine, to make sure the skin gets dry and crispy and browns nicely. The bottom part can be wet where the juices have dripped down into the pan, but the top isn't so bad.
People just like to think they can know who the monsters are, but they can't.

Offline "couldbecousin"

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Re: Happy Canadian Thanksgiving!
« Reply #14 on: October 09, 2017, 06:38:42 PM »
Actually... I think you're right about the arse end. I got confused because the skin gets pulled down over the other hole, which makes it look kind of like a puckered asshole with a covering.  :-[

The whole point of brining a turkey and not stuffing it is so it doesn't get dry, especially the white meat. That and putting some flavour into the meat. I prefer the dark meat myself, I find the white pretty bland. But each to their own taste. For sopping wet, you're supposed to pat it down with paper towel or something when it comes out of the brine, to make sure the skin gets dry and crispy and browns nicely. The bottom part can be wet where the juices have dripped down into the pan, but the top isn't so bad.

  *sneaks into the house and helps self to the delicious briny turkey!*   :devour:
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