Author Topic: Google Doodles  (Read 5362 times)

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Offline Gopher Gary

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Re: Google Doodles
« Reply #435 on: February 01, 2018, 04:58:38 PM »
Today's Google Doodle is Celebrating Carter G. Woodson.



Today’s Doodle by Virginia-based illustrator Shannon Wright and developed in collaboration with the Black Googlers Network (one of the largest employee resource groups at Google), marks the beginning of Black History Month by celebrating Carter G. Woodson - the man often called the “Father of Black History.” Woodson’s legacy inspired me to become an African American Studies major in college, and I am honored to kick off Google’s celebration this month by highlighting the life of this great American scholar.

Woodson was born in 1875 in New Canton, Virginia, to former slaves Anne Eliza and James Henry Woodson. His parents never had the opportunity to learn to read and write, but he had an appetite for education from the very beginning. As a young man, he helped support his family through farming and working as a miner, which meant that most of his education came via self-instruction. He eventually entered high school at the age of 20 and earned his diploma in less than two years!

Woodson went on to earn a master’s degree from the University of Chicago, after which he became the second African-American ever to receive a doctorate from Harvard University. He was also one of the first scholars to focus on the study of African-American history, writing over a dozen books on the topic over the years.

In addition to studying it himself, Woodson was committed to bringing African-American history front and center and ensuring it was taught in schools and studied by other scholars. He devised a program to encourage this study, which began in February of 1926 as a weeklong event. Woodson chose February for this celebration to commemorate the birth months of abolitionist Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln. This program eventually expanded to become what we now today as Black History Month.

Woodson’s commitment to achieve an education for himself and spread awareness and pride in Black history inspired me and continues to do so in so many ways. As a black woman from an underserved, underperforming public school in Richmond, California, many in my community didn’t expect me to achieve much beyond the four corners of my neighborhood. When I voiced my ambition to go to Harvard, I was told by teachers, guidance counselors, and even some family members that “people like me” didn’t go to schools like that. Fortunately, my parents believed in me and supported ambitions beyond their vision and experience. That support, along with the inspiration of great American leaders like Woodson, gave me the confidence to follow my dreams and achieve more than I’ve ever imagined.

This Black History Month, I encourage others to learn more about the incredible legacy, contribution, and journey of black people in the United States. I also hope they will be inspired by the example of Carter G. Woodson and challenge themselves to push beyond any perceived limitations to achieve a goal they may think is just out of reach.

-Sherice Torres, Director of Brand Marketing at Google & Black Googlers Network member
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Offline Gopher Gary

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Re: Google Doodles
« Reply #436 on: February 03, 2018, 07:27:34 AM »
Today's Google Doodle is Elizabeth Blackwell’s 197th Birthday.



“It is not easy to be a pioneer – but oh, it is fascinating!”

-Elizabeth Blackwell

 

As the first woman in the United States to earn a medical degree, an active champion of women’s rights, and an abolitionist, Elizabeth Blackwell was nothing if not a pioneer.

Blackwell grew up in Bristol and emigrated to the United States with her family, where she began her professional life as a teacher. Early on, she asserted her moral convictions: when a teaching position in Kentucky exposed her to the brutality of slavery for the first time, she set up a Sunday school for slaves and became a staunch abolitionist.

Years later, the death of a friend prompted her foray into medicine, as Blackwell believed a female physician might have lessened her friend’s suffering. She persisted through seemingly endless rejections from medical schools – at least once being told that she should dress as a man in order to gain admittance. Finally, she was accepted into the Geneva Medical College by a unanimous vote of the all-male student body. She went on to establish a women-governed infirmary, found two medical colleges for women, and mentor several physicians.

Today’s Doodle is by illustrator Harriet Lee Merrion – who happens to be based in Bristol and regularly cycles past the house where Elizabeth grew up! Her illustration shows Blackwell in the midst of her pioneering practice and celebrates the significant positive impact she had on the lives of people around the world.
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Offline DirtDawg

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Re: Google Doodles
« Reply #437 on: February 03, 2018, 03:40:30 PM »
I had never even heard of a theremin.  :orly:

It's an awesome instrument. I've heard Jean Michel Jarre play one in concert.

Just following links to get back here, but ...


GOD DAMN!!!!!!!
Confucius: A man who has mosquito land upon testicles finds a way to solve problems without violence. (Surely, a modern bastardization of TeH Master)

Ghandi: Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.

The end result of life's daily pain and suffering, trials and failures, tears and laughter, readings and listenings is an accumulation of wisdom in its purest form. (from My heart to You! Never stop learning!)

Offline odeon

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Re: Google Doodles
« Reply #438 on: February 03, 2018, 04:21:37 PM »
I had never even heard of a theremin.  :orly:

It's an awesome instrument. I've heard Jean Michel Jarre play one in concert.

Just following links to get back here, but ...


GOD DAMN!!!!!!!

And the sound was among the best I've heard live.
To me it looks like you're saying that banning bombs didn't stop bombs going off therefore there is no point to gun control because it's a mental health issue. 

Offline DirtDawg

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Re: Google Doodles
« Reply #439 on: February 07, 2018, 12:23:37 PM »
I had never even heard of a theremin.  :orly:

It's an awesome instrument. I've heard Jean Michel Jarre play one in concert.

Just following links to get back here, but ...


GOD DAMN!!!!!!!

And the sound was among the best I've heard live.

Had to throw that at me right?   :clap:
I would love to have experienced this concert!

I seldom talk about the best sound I have heard, because often I was at the helm in some way. It was my sound system. Now why would that be?

Well, I am a narcissistic ego maniac for one thing.
OK, but when I created a massive sound system from a pure idea, I built one that sounded the way I like live sound to sound, full, rich, crisp, deep, articulate. When everything fell into place, great venue, a stage full of professionals, polite, engaged crowd, everyone is  (sober) on their best game, we can experience some amazing live performances.

I generally tried to maintain between fifteen and twenty five decibels of headroom to allow for massive dynamics using very little compression. Even a small ensemble can benefit from this approach, especially an all acoustic group.

SO the best sound I ever heard - impossible, since I have heard a lot of great sound over my many years in that particular business.

I have never seen Jarre in concert, even on the sidelines, but I would love to. Doubt he still tours.

Confucius: A man who has mosquito land upon testicles finds a way to solve problems without violence. (Surely, a modern bastardization of TeH Master)

Ghandi: Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.

The end result of life's daily pain and suffering, trials and failures, tears and laughter, readings and listenings is an accumulation of wisdom in its purest form. (from My heart to You! Never stop learning!)

Offline Gopher Gary

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Re: Google Doodles
« Reply #440 on: February 08, 2018, 09:39:54 PM »
Today's Google Doodle is Paula Modersohn-Becker’s 142nd Birthday



Renowned German expressionist painter Paula Modersohn-Becker was born on this day in 1876. Her art bears witness to her courage, boldness, and ambition — a temperament that greatly influenced her short but prolific career.

Exposed to the intellectual world from the time she was a young child growing up in Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Modersohn-Becker began her artistic endeavors as a student in Bremen, and at the age of 18, moved to an artist’s colony in Worpswede. There she met her future husband, but hungry to learn more, she moved to Paris to study and urged him to join her.

In the years that followed, her personal life underwent many changes. But through all the turbulence, she continued to paint, producing more than 80 pictures in 1906 alone. Her writings explain this frenetic pace as a necessity to make up for the first two ‘lost’ decades of her life.

An early expressionist, she joined the likes of Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse in introducing modernism to the world. Modersohn-Becker was known for her bold choices as an artist — be it her depictions of nude female figures (among the very first women artists to do so), or those of women breastfeeding their children. She tenaciously resisted the strict expectations held of women of her era, preferring exploration and painting over more traditional pastimes.

Today’s Doodle reflects her artistic style depicting domestic subjects, and is illustrated by Berlin-based duo Golden Cosmos.

Happy Birthday, Paula Modersohn-Becker!
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Offline odeon

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Re: Google Doodles
« Reply #441 on: February 13, 2018, 02:32:01 AM »
I had never even heard of a theremin.  :orly:

It's an awesome instrument. I've heard Jean Michel Jarre play one in concert.

Just following links to get back here, but ...


GOD DAMN!!!!!!!

And the sound was among the best I've heard live.

Had to throw that at me right?   :clap:
I would love to have experienced this concert!

I seldom talk about the best sound I have heard, because often I was at the helm in some way. It was my sound system. Now why would that be?

Well, I am a narcissistic ego maniac for one thing.
OK, but when I created a massive sound system from a pure idea, I built one that sounded the way I like live sound to sound, full, rich, crisp, deep, articulate. When everything fell into place, great venue, a stage full of professionals, polite, engaged crowd, everyone is  (sober) on their best game, we can experience some amazing live performances.

I generally tried to maintain between fifteen and twenty five decibels of headroom to allow for massive dynamics using very little compression. Even a small ensemble can benefit from this approach, especially an all acoustic group.

SO the best sound I ever heard - impossible, since I have heard a lot of great sound over my many years in that particular business.

I have never seen Jarre in concert, even on the sidelines, but I would love to. Doubt he still tours.

I think he still does. https://jeanmicheljarre.com/tour
To me it looks like you're saying that banning bombs didn't stop bombs going off therefore there is no point to gun control because it's a mental health issue.